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  • Deborah Hurn

    Member
    September 26, 2021 at 5:50 am

    MOUNT SINAI IN THE SOUTHERN SINAI PENINSULA

    The tradition that Mount Sinai lies in the southern Sinai Peninsula arose from biblical indications that a great distance lies between Mount Sinai-Horeb and Kadesh-barnea. The Deuteronomy foreword seems to situate Mount Horeb at eleven days’ walking distance from Kadesh-barnea (Deut 1:1-2, cf. v. 19),[1] while the Numbers itinerary lists some twenty stations between these terminals (Num 33:16-36).[2] The prophet Elijah, having travelled a day’s journey past Beersheba into the wilderness, then went a further forty days without food on his pilgrimage to Mount Horeb (1 Kgs 19:3-8). Kadesh-barnea, known to lie on the southern border of Judah (Num 34:4; Josh 15:1-4), was eventually identified at Ayn Qudayrat[3] some three or four days’ walk southwest from Beersheba (78 linear km) on a trajectory towards the southern Sinai.

    Explorers who support the traditional location of Mount Sinai at Jebel Musa or other peaks in southern Sinai include John L. Burckhardt,[4] Eduard Rüppell,[5] Edward Robinson,[6] Edward H. Palmer,[7] Samuel C. Bartlett,[8] and W. M. Flinders Petrie.[9] Later scholars supporting a southern Mount Sinai include Yohanan Aharoni,[10] Israel Finkelstein,[11] Kenneth A. Kitchen,[12]James K. Hoffmeier,[13] Anson F. Rainey,[14] and Barry J. Beitzel.[15]

    [1]</sup></sup> See #6.5 “Eleven days from Horeb”.

    [2]</sup></sup> See #6.14 Wanderings: Zin and Paran.

    [3]</sup></sup> Woolley and Lawrence, Wilderness of Zin, 1914–1915:6.

    [4]</sup></sup> Jebel Serbal. Burckhardt, Travels in Syria.

    [5]</sup></sup> Jebel Serbal. Eduard Rüppell, Reisen in Nubien, Kordofan, Und Dem Petraischen Arabien (Frankfurt am Main: Friedrich Wilmans, 1829).

    [6]</sup></sup> Jebel Musa. Robinson, Biblical Researches, I:87–213.

    [7]</sup></sup> Ras Safsafa. Palmer, The Desert of the Exodus, Part I:1–145.

    [8]</sup></sup> Jebel Serbal. Bartlett, From Egypt to Palestine, 238–84.

    [9]</sup></sup> Jebel Serbal. Petrie, Researches in Sinai, 206, 247–54 Petrie’s assistant, Charles T. Currelly, wrote the last four chapters about Mount Sinai and the southern regions.

    10]</sup></sup> Unspecified peak. Yohanan Aharoni, The Land of Israel in Bible Times (Hbw), First published 1949 (Jerusalem: Bialik Institute, 1962), 169–73.

    [11]</sup></sup> Unspecified peak. Finkelstein and Perevolotsky, “Southern Sinai Exodus Route,” 26–35, 38–41.

    [12]</sup></sup> Jebel Musa. Kenneth A. Kitchen, On the Reliability of the Old Testament (Grand Rapids, MI / Cambridge, U.K.: Eerdmans, 2003), 170.

    [13]</sup></sup> Ras Safsafa or Jebel Serbal. Hoffmeier, Ancient Israel in Sinai, 140–48.

    [14]</sup></sup> Unspecified peak. Rainey and Notley, The Sacred Bridge, 120.

    [15]</sup></sup> Prefers Jebel Musa. Beitzel, New Moody Bible Atlas, 112–13.