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Home Forums The route of the Exodus through the Red Sea The near-Egypt Egyptian approach vs. the far-from-Egypt Hebrew approach

  • The near-Egypt Egyptian approach vs. the far-from-Egypt Hebrew approach

  • Historical Faith Society

    Administrator
    December 18, 2020 at 4:34 am
  • Deborah Hurn

    Member
    December 30, 2020 at 12:18 am

    I (Deb) would prefer these categories to be simply named “near-Egypt” and “far-from-Egypt”. There is nothing specifically “Hebrew” about theories that place the crossing sites in the Gulf of Aqaba, and, for that matter, nothing specifically “Egyptian” about theories that place the crossing site in the Suez Isthmus or Gulf (or even along the Med Sea coast). All the Red Sea crossing theories are interpretations of the biblical texts in the light of the geographical realia.

  • The H Family

    Member
    January 9, 2021 at 8:36 am

    We purchased the course Searching for the Red Sea Crossing by Glen Fritz and watched the first lesson last night. We found it extremely insightful, and would recommend it to others. He did an excellent job examining the meaning of Yam Suph and the various locations that are proposed. Great job Dr. Fritz!

  • Thomas Donlon

    Member
    January 20, 2021 at 9:11 pm

    Red Sea Miracles (part 2) suggested that a man named Ron Wyatt found a pillar on the far side of Aqaba in Saudi Arabia. Claimed the Saudi’s took it away. It wouldn’t be the worst idea if somehow the Saudi’s could be asked if they still had it.

    Now Ron Wyatt was portrayed as controversial in the movie. There was a clip of him saying that he had some electronic equipment that he used that was able to triangulate gold at a distance.

    I’m pretty sure equipment like that doesn’t exist. Even if it does exist now it would have been well out the reach of a man like Ron. So Ron remained very controversial in my eyes. The other divers with him that made a claim to seeing something convincing … I’ll not say anything now barring finding more substantial evidence.

    There are so many smart people who have ideas on the crossing site. What type of approaches can be used to unearth evidence though? Ground penetrating radar?

    • Deborah Hurn

      Member
      January 20, 2021 at 11:10 pm

      Thomas, the case for the location of the Red Sea crossing cannot be made by looking for remains of Pharaoh’s army on a sea-bed or in a marsh. If we take seriously the texts that report this crossing and purport to locate it by multiple references to this or that geographical detail, we need to be really sure we have reconciled all those data to a near-certain location before spending a lot of money to find material evidence. Just think of the money wasted on searching for the lost Malaysian airline MH370 without knowing its flight-path. https://www.the-sun.com/news/1837801/mh370-missing-malaysia-flight-search/ Historical geographers are not at all agreed on the likely location of the crossing site, as Tim shows in his survey of the various options. All hypotheses privilege some data over others because so far there is no route that can accommodate all the biblical indications.

  • Deborah Hurn

    Member
    April 24, 2021 at 8:01 am

    The historical geographer’s job also involves observing what is not said in the biblical texts. Which sites and regions of the journey in the southern wildernesses never feature again in biblical stories after the exodus and conquest? There are so many it would be a lot easier to list those that do feature again. There are fewer than 10: Migdol (if the same one), Shur, Kadesh, Ezion-geber, Elath, Arabah [but only in the north], Zin, Paran, Horeb (thanks to Elijah).

    The absence of most of the exodus and wanderings toponyms from later Israelite history supports the likely historical quality of the narrative. The names you would expect to see around the Aqaba Gulf appear in later kings’ shipping ventures: Elath, Ezion-geber. But the names before and after the Red Sea crossing are missing. This pattern supports a crossing over near Egypt, never again visited by Israelites.

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